CORNS 

Corns are small areas of concentrated thickened, hard skin which form on the soles of the feet or between the toes in response to recurring friction or pressure. Thick layers of dead skin cells accumulate forming a nucleus, usually conical with the apex pointing inwards and so causing pain on pressure. 
 
Corns may develop due to badly fitting shoes or in people with a lack of natural cushioning possibly caused by the aging process. They may develop as a symptom of another foot problem such as a bunion (a bony swelling at the base of the big toe) or hammer toe (where the toe is raised), both causing increased pressure and friction. 
 
There are five different types of corns, the most common of which are ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ corns: 
 
Hard corns – these are the most common and appear as a small area of concentrated hard skin up to the size of a small pea usually within a wider area of thickened skin or callus. This may be a symptom of the feet or toes not functioning properly. 
Soft corns – these develop in a similar way to hard corns but they are whitish and rubbery in texture and appear between toes where the skin is moist from sweat or from inadequate drying. 
Seed corns – these are tiny corns that tend to occur either singly or in clusters on the bottom of the foot and are usually painless. 
Vascular corns – these can be very painful and can bleed profusely if cut. 
Fibrous corns – these arise when corns have been present for a long time and are more firmly attached to the deeper tissues than any other type of corn. They may also be painful. 

CORNS 

Corns are small areas of concentrated thickened, hard skin which form on the soles of the feet or between the toes in response to recurring friction or pressure. Thick layers of dead skin cells accumulate forming a nucleus, usually conical with the apex pointing inwards and so causing pain on pressure. 
 
Corns may develop due to badly fitting shoes or in people with a lack of natural cushioning possibly caused by the aging process. They may develop as a symptom of another foot problem such as a bunion (a bony swelling at the base of the big toe) or hammer toe (where the toe is raised), both causing increased pressure and friction. 
 
There are five different types of corns, the most common of which are ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ corns: 
 
Hard corns – these are the most common and appear as a small area of concentrated hard skin up to the size of a small pea usually within a wider area of thickened skin or callus. This may be a symptom of the feet or toes not functioning properly. 
Soft corns – these develop in a similar way to hard corns but they are whitish and rubbery in texture and appear between toes where the skin is moist from sweat or from inadequate drying. 
Seed corns – these are tiny corns that tend to occur either singly or in clusters on the bottom of the foot and are usually painless. 
Vascular corns – these can be very painful and can bleed profusely if cut. 
Fibrous corns – these arise when corns have been present for a long time and are more firmly attached to the deeper tissues than any other type of corn. They may also be painful. 
 
A full assessment will be undertaken to determine the cause of the corn to prevent recurrence and to plan a course of treatment. The corn is skilfully enucleated using a sharp blade to remove the dead, thickened skin.  
 
Attempting to do this yourself at home is not recommended, please seek advice from your foot health practitioner or podiatrist. 
 
Padding, toe separators or insoles may be recommended to relieve any pressure to the affected areas. 
 
Diabetic patients should avoid using over the counter corn removers and medicated corn plasters as they may cause skin irritation and ulceration. 
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